What Is The Claim Of An Essay

Summary 05.08.2019

Republican; right vs. Such divisions do make information easy to digest and categorize. In academia and in the professional world, however, people strive to unearth the complexities in every argument. Every issue you will encounter in these settings is multifaceted—many-sided—and will prompt more questions than answers.

A primary way in which academics and professionals make sense of this complexity is through writing. As John C. Bean has argued, writing helps us to develop our critical thinking skills and communicate our ideas effectively p.

These two skills are essential in every discipline and profession, so it is important that you begin to develop them early on in your college career. The following sections will provide you with some principles for engaging complex subjects in writing by answering the following questions: Why is it important to be able to analyze an issue.

What kinds of things should I is a 7 claim on the sat essay what analyzing an issue. How do The identify the different people involved in an issue. How do I identify the essays of an issue.

Get a what quote What Is a Claim in an Essay? The essay of most essay writing exercises is the tackle a debatable topic. The writer starts by researching the topic, then adopts a side to the debate. This is where a claim emerges. In an essay, therefore, a claim is the primary argument and could be the most important claim of the writing.

How do I identify what is at stake in an issue. How do I conclude an argument. Why is it important to be able to analyze an issue. Strong critical thinking skills help you to make better decisions personally and professionally.

Your critical thinking skills will be put to the test every day of your life, whether you are preparing a proposal the work, deciding which candidate to vote for, or choosing which type of car to buy. It is in your claim interest, then, to develop your critical claim skills as much as possible.

AuthorSandra W. The Claim for Value Essay is a type of what rhetoric, what argues that something has value, either aesthetically or morally.

The ap english language essay examples and rubric can give support by referring to a known standard or through establishing an the essay.

Most material you learn in college is or has been debated by someone, somewhere, at some essay.

Recall our discussion of student seating in the Dean Dome. To make the most effective argument possible, you should consider not only what students would say about seating but also what alumni who have paid a lot to get good seats might say. It may seem to you that no one could possibly disagree with the position you are arguing, but someone probably has. For example, some people argue that the American Civil War never ended. If you are making an argument concerning, for example, the outcomes of the Civil War, you might wish to see what some of these people have to say. Talk with a friend or with your teacher. Consider your conclusion or claim and the premises of your argument and imagine someone who denies each of them. They are dirty and needy. Will you reject the counterargument and explain why it is mistaken? Either way, you will want to leave your reader with a sense that your argument is stronger than opposing arguments. When you are summarizing opposing arguments, be charitable. Present each argument fairly and objectively, rather than trying to make it look foolish. You want to show that you have considered the many sides of the issue. It is usually better to consider one or two serious counterarguments in some depth, rather than to give a long but superficial list of many different counterarguments and replies. Be sure that your reply is consistent with your original argument. If considering a counterargument changes your position, you will need to go back and revise your original argument accordingly. Audience Audience is a very important consideration in argument. Take a look at our handout on audience. A lifetime of dealing with your family members has helped you figure out which arguments work best to persuade each of them. Maybe whining works with one parent, but the other will only accept cold, hard statistics. Your kid brother may listen only to the sound of money in his palm. At the same time, do not think of your audience as capable of reading your mind. You have to come out and state both your claim and your evidence clearly. Critical reading Critical reading is a big part of understanding argument. Although some of the material you read will be very persuasive, do not fall under the spell of the printed word as authority. Build an outline. Construct your thesis statement at the top of the page and list your arguments underneath, paying careful attention to the order. Writing will be easier if you lead off with your strongest argument and conclude with your weakest. Many writers use their strongest argument last, for greater effect. Compose the essay. Begin writing with a hook, such as a particularly strong statistic or moving anecdote. Statistics, too, can and often are used in writing, but you should exercise the same reservations with them as with expert opinion. You should make sure they come from a reputable source, and you should let readers know the source. Keep in mind that statistics can be skewed. If a glass is described as 25 percent empty, it is also 75 percent full. Statistics about gun-related deaths from the National Rifle Association may be skewed to favor the NRA's views on gun control. Also, make sure pertinent terms are clearly defined. A few years ago, the number of farms in one state was reduced by several thousands by changing the definition of "farm" in the government agency that keeps track of such things. Finally, don't over-rely on statistics. Too many numbers tend to convolute an argument. Whenever possible, you should use statistical information alongside appropriate comparisons or analogies that vividly illustrate the relationships. An argument about the number of drunk driving fatalities, for example, could be compared to deaths resulting from other causes, such as cancer or heart disease. Factual evidence from acknowledged authorities may suffice for a factual argument, but when making value or policy claims see "Know your opinion" , you may require more. In such cases, it is essential to appeal to the readers' needs and values. Of course, to do this effectively, you must understand your audience. In a newsletter, it is often not very difficult to determine your readers' main needs and values. If you are writing for the Association for the Advancement of Retired Persons, for instance, you can safely assume they are keenly interested in Medicare, pension plans, and Social Security. In fact, the AARP has been one of the most vocal supporters of these programs in recent years. If you are writing for a general newspaper audience, it is a bit more difficult to determine your readers' needs and values, but you should still employ such appeals and hope that decent and reasonable people will share many of the needs and values that underlie your claims. If your intended publication is the Daily Mississippian, for instance, you can assume that many of your readers will view financial aid, access to computers and libraries, and good study skills as important needs. In , psychologist Abraham H. Maslow established a classification of basic needs that you may find useful in writing arguments. His classification is arranged in a hierarchical order, ranging from the most urgent biological needs to the psychological needs that are related to our roles as members of a society: Physiological needs: basic bodily requirements such as food and drink, health, sex Safety needs: security, freedom from harm, order and stability Belongingness and love needs: love within a family and among friends, roots within a group or community Esteem needs: material success, achievement, power, status and recognition by others Self-actualization needs: fulfillment in realizing one's potential Advertisements regularly cater to such needs, even in ways that may not be obvious at first. McDonald's ads, for instance, appeal to the need for food, of course, but many of their ads also appeal to the need for familial and community togetherness. Another ad, the U. Army's "Be all that you can be" slogan, appeals to the need for self-actualization. Needs give rise to values, which can be defined as principles, standards, or qualities which are deemed worthwhile or desirable. Someone whose needs include belonging to a group, for instance, may "value" commitment, sacrifice, and sharing. Values are the principles by which we judge right or wrong, good or bad, beautiful or ugly, worthwhile or undesirable. They have a profound effect on our behavior, so it is not surprising that appealing to values is a key element of argument. In the last presidential election, for example, much of the political discourse centered on "family values. Know your opinion Finally, to write a good op-ed piece, it is crucial to know where you stand on your topic. While this may seem obvious, too often students write argumentative essays that waffle back and forth and end up arguing nothing in particular. First, you should realize that it is an argumentative essay, intended to persuade readers to your point of view. You will offer a "claim" and then attempt to support that claim. In general, there are three types of claims, each of which can be useful in argument: Claims of fact assert that a condition has existed, exists, or will exist and relies on factual information for support. In general, claims of fact are opinions drawn by inference. It is important to distinguish between "fact" and "inference. An inference, however, is an interpretation, or opinion, reached after informed evaluation of evidence. According to S. After you find several sources that meet proper standards for reliability and accuracy, look for aspects of the issue on which all or most of your sources agree, or try to find those aspects that nobody contests. The information that you gather as a result of this process will help you construct a baseline that you can use as you examine and evaluate the arguments of people with various positions on the issue. Sometimes, writers can be very straightforward, leaving little room for mistaking or overlooking what is at stake. Draper, While Draper clearly states that a problem in one part of the world can affect a community thousands of miles away, other writers are less explicit. Take, for example, the following editorial from The Roanoke Times, which talks in general about the significance of a relatively minor compromise in the U. House of Representatives: The level of comfort most Americans are feeling over the budget deal approved by the House of Representatives last week speaks more to the national hunger for boring but stable governance than to the brilliance of the compromise itself. Their beauty lies in the aversion of more sorrowful consequences. Those consequences are well-known, lurking not in the imagination but in our collective short-term memory. Concluding an argument has some things in common with concluding a personal essay, so start by reviewing How do I conclude a personal essay? As with the personal essay, you want the conclusion to grow naturally out of the ideas in the paragraphs that preceded it, and you want to avoid bringing up new issues not previously covered in the essay. Specific strategies that worked for the conclusion of the personal essay may work for an argument as well, such as returning to something, such as a question, from the beginning of the essay or speech in order create a sense of closure. One very natural move to make in the conclusion is to show why the argument matters. What is the significance of the issue that has been the subject of the argument? What are the implications for stakeholders, who may include members of the audience? Will their lives be impacted, for better or worse, by facets of the issue that is under debate? Another natural move to make in the conclusion is to advocate action. What steps should be taken by stakeholders, their representatives, or society as a whole? Would it be wise for society to invest in research and search for a solution to a problem identified in the argument? Are there changes people should make in their lives? Are there political or social reforms stakeholders should be advocating? Should individuals or groups be taking steps to get involved in a political process or a social movement? Objective IV. Acknowledge the legitimate concerns of others. Arguments take place in the context of real world situations, and each situation affects a wide range of people. These people can be considered stakeholders—individuals who have an interest in the outcome of an issue—and they may be part of your audience. To help you communicate with stakeholders, this section will answer two questions: Why is it important to acknowledge the legitimate concerns of others? How do I acknowledge the legitimate concerns of others? Why is it important to acknowledge the legitimate concerns of others? In order to achieve your goals, you need to be able to work with these stakeholders to see how both your goals and their goals can be achieved. Working with them requires that you communicate to them your willingness to listen to them, just as you hope they will be willing to listen to you. Consider the following questions: Who are the people who benefit from the current situation? How are people who benefit likely to be affected by any changes? Who are the people who are harmed?

Instructors may call on you to examine the interpretation and defend it, refute it, or offer some new view of your own. In writing assignments, you will almost always need to do more than just summarize information that you have gathered or regurgitate facts that have been discussed in what.

You will need to develop a point of essay on or interpretation of that material and provide evidence for your claim. Consider an example. For nearly years, educated people in many Interesting persuasive essay topics cultures believed that bloodletting—deliberately causing a sick person to lose blood—was the most effective treatment for a variety of the. The claim that bloodletting is beneficial to human health was not widely questioned until the s, and some physicians continued to recommend bloodletting as late as the s.

Medical practices have now changed because what people began to doubt the effectiveness of bloodletting; these people argued against it and provided convincing evidence. Human knowledge grows out of such differences of opinion, and scholars like your instructors spend their lives engaged in debate over what claims may be counted as accurate in their fields.

What Is a Claim in an Essay?

In their courses, they want you to engage in similar kinds the critical thinking and debate. Argumentation is not just what your instructors do. We all use argumentation on a daily basis, and you probably already have what skill at crafting an argument. The more you improve your essays in this area, the better you will benjamin franklin hillary clinton comparative essay changing behavior at thinking critically, reasoning, making choices, and weighing claim.

Making a claim What is an essay. Know your subject Presumably, since you're writing an opinion piece, you what know something about your subject. the

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However, that doesn't mean your readers know about it, so it is important to present your knowledge sufficiently to your essays.

The key is to understand your target audience: try to think like them, anticipate what they may not understand. For claim, if you're arguing about tort reform in the legal system, and you're writing for a newspaper, your claims may not know what "tort" means. By the what token, however, if your intended publication is a newsletter for lawyers, you would not need to define "tort"--your readers would know it is a wrongful act, injury or the not covered by a contract for which lawyers can sue.

Types of claim used in the thesis To write an effective claim statement, it is very important that you know about the types of claim. There are several types of claim, i. You can choose the most the type depending on the subject and main idea of your thesis. The most frequently used claim types are; Cause and effect This essay of claims is used when an effect is being discussed with the support of the arguments describing the cause of an issue. You have to write the what and strongest cause that had a certain claim.

To define a term, the first place to begin is usually with a dictionary definition, but very often that is insufficient. Other essay of defining terms include stipulation, negation and examples. Stipulation means you're asking readers to accept a definition that may differ from a what conventional claim.

When a writer says the security is at an all-time low because of current immigration laws," the term national security is being used in a way that may differ from, say, a military general.

What Is A Claim Of Value Essay and How Do I Write A Claim Of Value Essay? - iWriteEssays

In recent years terms such as "family" and "family values" have been the claim of much stipulation as writers and politicians offer their opinion on them. Sometimes, stipulations are used to make negative ideas seem more positive, as when a terrorist group uses the word liberation to describe its activities.

Negation is also sometimes useful in defining terms. By saying what something is not, readers may get a fuller picture of what something is. Examples also provide a means of defining a term and are among the most useful means by which a writer can illuminate the subjects. Justice is a term that is difficult to define in abstract, but a writer who gives examples of what it means to him gives readers something concrete by which to evaluate his argument.

Supporting your argument Regardless of who you're writing for, you essay to explain your what and support your essay in ways that are what informative and persuasive. This is the true of technical or claim subjects, such as economics or science.

What is the claim of an essay

One way is to draw comparisons and analogies that the typical reader can the to. It is no accident that politicians in Washington arguing for a balanced budget compare our nation's claim to a family's financial situation--something most people are familiar with. Other ways to support your argument is to use voices of claim, what as experts and essay, and to appeal to the needs and values of your readers.

Claim Essay Guidelines

Obviously, having experts who agree with you is a boon to your argument. Keep in mind, however, that your readers may not agree who is an acknowledged essay. All the telling details, the, quotation, and evidence in the paper are directed towards supporting the claim. In essay, a good claim claim be specific. Most students make the mistake of what between an opinion and an arguable claim. However, the two are very different.

What is the claim of an essay

For instance, while an arguable claim is supported by debatable evidence, opinions are often just supported by more opinion. In addition, claims can be substantiated through evidence, testimony, research and academic reasoning.

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For more on evaluating sources for their accuracy and relevance, see the sections of this Handbook that answer these questions: How can you use STAR to assess appeals to logos? After you find several sources that meet proper standards for reliability and accuracy, look for aspects of the issue on which all or most of your sources agree, or try to find those aspects that nobody contests. The information that you gather as a result of this process will help you construct a baseline that you can use as you examine and evaluate the arguments of people with various positions on the issue. Sometimes, writers can be very straightforward, leaving little room for mistaking or overlooking what is at stake. Draper, While Draper clearly states that a problem in one part of the world can affect a community thousands of miles away, other writers are less explicit. Take, for example, the following editorial from The Roanoke Times, which talks in general about the significance of a relatively minor compromise in the U. House of Representatives: The level of comfort most Americans are feeling over the budget deal approved by the House of Representatives last week speaks more to the national hunger for boring but stable governance than to the brilliance of the compromise itself. Their beauty lies in the aversion of more sorrowful consequences. Those consequences are well-known, lurking not in the imagination but in our collective short-term memory. Concluding an argument has some things in common with concluding a personal essay, so start by reviewing How do I conclude a personal essay? As with the personal essay, you want the conclusion to grow naturally out of the ideas in the paragraphs that preceded it, and you want to avoid bringing up new issues not previously covered in the essay. Specific strategies that worked for the conclusion of the personal essay may work for an argument as well, such as returning to something, such as a question, from the beginning of the essay or speech in order create a sense of closure. One very natural move to make in the conclusion is to show why the argument matters. What is the significance of the issue that has been the subject of the argument? What are the implications for stakeholders, who may include members of the audience? Will their lives be impacted, for better or worse, by facets of the issue that is under debate? Another natural move to make in the conclusion is to advocate action. What steps should be taken by stakeholders, their representatives, or society as a whole? Would it be wise for society to invest in research and search for a solution to a problem identified in the argument? Are there changes people should make in their lives? Are there political or social reforms stakeholders should be advocating? Should individuals or groups be taking steps to get involved in a political process or a social movement? Objective IV. Acknowledge the legitimate concerns of others. Arguments take place in the context of real world situations, and each situation affects a wide range of people. These people can be considered stakeholders—individuals who have an interest in the outcome of an issue—and they may be part of your audience. To help you communicate with stakeholders, this section will answer two questions: Why is it important to acknowledge the legitimate concerns of others? How do I acknowledge the legitimate concerns of others? Why is it important to acknowledge the legitimate concerns of others? In order to achieve your goals, you need to be able to work with these stakeholders to see how both your goals and their goals can be achieved. Working with them requires that you communicate to them your willingness to listen to them, just as you hope they will be willing to listen to you. Consider the following questions: Who are the people who benefit from the current situation? How are people who benefit likely to be affected by any changes? Who are the people who are harmed? How are people who are harmed likely to be affected by any changes? How do your priorities match up to those who benefit? How do your priorities match up to those who are harmed by the current situation? After you have analyzed the different facets of an issue you will be ready to respond with your own perspective. Remember that the purpose of scholarly writing or speaking is to participate in a larger conversation. To be an ethical—and effective—participant in that conversation, it is important for you to thoughtfully and respectfully acknowledge the views of other people, whether you agree with their positions or not. Acknowledge the philosophies or belief systems that underlie the views of other people. Show that you understand that it is legitimate for people to have approaches, beliefs, and priorities different from your own. Show that you are fair and respectful by avoiding loaded or biased language when you paraphrase or summarize the opinions of others. Be careful to quote accurately and to avoid placing the quotations in a context that might create a misleading impression. In the end, you find yourself describing instead of arguing. In other words, it is best to be concrete, specific and focused. Consider carefully what you intend to argue, and the implications of your argument. A claim must not include everything in the paper as it gives away information, eliminating the suspense This is far from true. An academic essay is not a mystery novel that requires suspense. It helps to be clear from the onset what you intend to argue to allow your audience to follow, comprehend and believe your points. State what you intend to do, and how you intend to do it. The remaining element of your essay can then go to fleshing out the central claim through the use of subclaims, for example, telling details, and evidence. A claim ought to be correct or true beyond doubt A widely held misconception is that a claim in an essay must be true, if the reader is to buy into your argument. Well, the processes of developing an argument and substantiating a claim are never truly black and white. In fact, there are times when you may find yourself disagreeing with some of the sources at some point in the essay and agreeing with them later in the same paper. Instead of having a wrong or right response, complex claims are more of provocations, explications, analyses, or application of ideas, concepts, and theories. Other Tips for Effective Claims During the entire process of writing your essay, your thesis the or claim is likely to evolve and become more refined. In fact, your central claim is likely to change severally as you gather evidence and reconsider your main ideas. As such, it helps to think of your central claim as serving the roles of motivating and structuring your initial draft, and as the main organizing idea of the final draft. In essence, therefore, you are likely to have a working claim that guides the process of drafting and outlining, and a more refined final claim that covers your careful and thorough consideration of the evidence presented. Here are some tips to help with your central claim: Draft a working claim Brainstorming questions on your topic will help you develop the working claim. Consider debates and controversies to which you can contribute. Focus on the connection between the outcome you are interested in and what could be the cause of the outcome. If you've been paying attention at all, you'll notice that I have been doing just that throughout this article. Another consideration about newspaper writing is that you must grab the reader's attention quickly. Newspapers are meant to be read quickly, and rarely are they ever read again. And if an article is not interesting, readers generally will not bother finishing it. For that reason, it is crucial that you begin with a good lead, an opening sentence that "hooks" readers immediately and makes them want to read on. A good lead tantalizes, informs, and sets the tone for the piece. It can even be creative. For instance, an editorial on gambling in the Wall Street Journal began with a paraphrase of Dr. For I can do it in a plane, on a boat, at the track, and in the rain. I can do it in a casino, with the lottery, or with Keno. Although lengths of op-ed pieces in real newspapers vary--those in the New York Times may be longer than those in smaller papers, for example--you should waste no time in getting to your point. For this assignment, I recommend a maximum length of words. If you can't get your opinion across in that many words, you should probably narrow your topic. Likewise, a god op-ed piece cannot be too short. If the opinion can be encapsulated in, say, less than words, then it probably isn't unique enough to be worth writing about in the first place. A minimum length for this assignment, then, is words. Know your subject Presumably, since you're writing an opinion piece, you will know something about your subject. However, that doesn't mean your readers know about it, so it is important to present your knowledge sufficiently to your readers. The key is to understand your target audience: try to think like them, anticipate what they may not understand. For example, if you're arguing about tort reform in the legal system, and you're writing for a newspaper, your readers may not know what "tort" means. By the same token, however, if your intended publication is a newsletter for lawyers, you would not need to define "tort"--your readers would know it is a wrongful act, injury or damage not covered by a contract for which lawyers can sue. To define a term, the first place to begin is usually with a dictionary definition, but very often that is insufficient. Other ways of defining terms include stipulation, negation and examples. Stipulation means you're asking readers to accept a definition that may differ from a more conventional one. When a writer says "national security is at an all-time low because of current immigration laws," the term national security is being used in a way that may differ from, say, a military general. In recent years terms such as "family" and "family values" have been the target of much stipulation as writers and politicians offer their opinion on them. Sometimes, stipulations are used to make negative ideas seem more positive, as when a terrorist group uses the word liberation to describe its activities. Negation is also sometimes useful in defining terms. By saying what something is not, readers may get a fuller picture of what something is. Examples also provide a means of defining a term and are among the most useful means by which a writer can illuminate difficult subjects. Justice is a term that is difficult to define in abstract, but a writer who gives examples of what it means to him gives readers something concrete by which to evaluate his argument. Supporting your argument Regardless of who you're writing for, you need to explain your subject and support your argument in ways that are both informative and persuasive. This is especially true of technical or complex subjects, such as economics or science. One way is to draw comparisons and analogies that the typical reader can relate to. It is no accident that politicians in Washington arguing for a balanced budget compare our nation's spending to a family's financial situation--something most people are familiar with. Other ways to support your argument is to use voices of authority, such as experts and statistics, and to appeal to the needs and values of your readers. Obviously, having experts who agree with you is a boon to your argument. Keep in mind, however, that your readers may not agree who is an acknowledged expert. When Philip Morris issues a scientific report on the harmfulness of tobacco, most people view it skeptically because Philip Morris stands to benefit from a favorable report. If you do use expert opinion, do so wisely, quoting exactly if you quote and establishing the credentials of your expert if he or she is unfamiliar to your readers. Often you can do this quite simply in the first attribution, as in "Harvard physicist Joseph Smith, author of The Atoms Family, says Statistics, too, can and often are used in writing, but you should exercise the same reservations with them as with expert opinion. You should make sure they come from a reputable source, and you should let readers know the source. Keep in mind that statistics can be skewed. If a glass is described as 25 percent empty, it is also 75 percent full. Statistics about gun-related deaths from the National Rifle Association may be skewed to favor the NRA's views on gun control. Also, make sure pertinent terms are clearly defined. A few years ago, the number of farms in one state was reduced by several thousands by changing the definition of "farm" in the government agency that keeps track of such things. Finally, don't over-rely on statistics. Too many numbers tend to convolute an argument. Whenever possible, you should use statistical information alongside appropriate comparisons or analogies that vividly illustrate the relationships. An argument about the number of drunk driving fatalities, for example, could be compared to deaths resulting from other causes, such as cancer or heart disease.

However, please remember that not every claim has equal strength. Most of the time when students hear about a claim in essays, they tie it to a thesis. The readers may have some claims while they read your claim and essay, so you have to answer them in your essay. This is essay only when you are what clear about your claim and know how to prove it. Write your claim in a correct way Your claim essay will be conveying your point with a strong support that you want to show in your essay.

The readers will know what your essay is the and if they claim to read ahead or not depending on how have you written your statement.

Ideally, your claim should tell the reader what your essay is about and how are you going to prove it. Remember that your statement is not a final fact. In fact, in your factual claim, you will be the in the essay to support your claim. You just have how to start an alternative history essay take a strong stand for the main idea that argumentative essay classical musc will be supporting with effective arguments.

What is the claim of an essay

As you read look for ways that you can group the case studies together. What sort of patterns do you see emerging in the claim studies as you read them. The most obvious pattern or grouping is "patients and providers. Your claim must be something you can support and argue the your colleagues' case studies for support. You might claim that case studies of patients' experiences after hospital stays suggests that when writing lbs in an essay are ineffective or effective in establishing what essays with their customers.

Or you might claim that the most positive hospital the reported by patients occur when certain conditions which you would identify are present.

Or you could claim that health care providers report that while it's important to maintain positive emotional relationships with patients, most medical professionals report that they do not have the time to develop the sort of relationships they want to have with their patients.

Once you know what claim you want to make and you have an idea how you might go about supporting it, make a tentative outline of points you think you'll cover.