What I Gained From My Degree Essay

Deliberation 10.01.2020

My extensive experience working in a large non-profit organization, along with my courses dealing with various cultures, creates a good understanding of organizations within a broader context.

This includes fulfilling the minimum general education requirement as stated by SUNY. Recommended studies could include: statistics, psychology, sociology, oral and written communications.

What i gained from my degree essay

These types of studies are important so students are prepared to understand consumers, the market, and to be able to present and communicate essay with clients. Employers are hiring more employees that have a level of higher education; this makes it very difficult for people who only have a basic high school diploma to get a good paying job.

If students work hard through college and get a degree, it will pay off big time in the long run. Without one, a student will b stuck working minimum wage jobs. In addition to learning practical skills, being in college has also taught me a lot from social sciences such as sociology and history. For instance, I have had the privilege of learning about religions in unfamiliar parts of the world, such as Buddhism and Islam, that I had no knowledge of gained.

From this experience, I have learned many interesting things about the cultures in which these religions are typically followed. The atmosphere of too many residence halls drives serious students out of their own rooms functionally, their on-campus homes to study, write, reflect, and think.

Rethinking higher education means reconstituting institutional culture by rigorously identifying, evaluating and challenging the many damaging degrees that colleges and universities, individually and collectively, have made and continue to make to consumer and competitive pressures over the last several decades.

We mean the progressive reduction in academic, intellectual, and behavioral expectations that has undermined the culture, learning conditions, and civility of so many campus communities.

You can only do this if you revisit the brief repeatedly while writing. This will ensure you're still on the path you were originally pointed down and haven't gone off at a tangent. Writing a brilliant, original essay that doesn't meet the assignment brief is likely to be a frustrating waste of effort. True, you may well still get sufficient credit for your originality. But you'll achieve far more marks if you shoot for originality and accuracy. A clear, well-defined, sophisticated argument. A First-class essay sets out its intentions its own criteria for success explicitly. By the end of your first couple of paragraphs, your reader should know a what you are hoping to accomplish, and b how you plan on accomplishing it. Your central argument — or thesis — shapes everything else about your essay. So you need to make sure it's well-thought-out. For a First-class essay, this argument shouldn't just rehash the module material. It shouldn't regurgitate one the positions you've learned about in class. It should build on one or more of these positions by interrogating them, bringing them into conflict or otherwise disrupting them. Solid support for every single argument. You don't just need to make a sophisticated argument; you need to support it as well. Be particularly careful to back up anything contentious with rigorous, logically consistent argumentation. Undergraduates also often forget the need to effectively address counter-arguments to their own position. If there are alternative positions to the one you're taking and there almost always are , don't omit these from your essay. Address them head-on by quoting their authors if they're established positions. Or, simply hypothesise alternative interpretations to your own. Explain why your position is more persuasive, logical, or better-supported than the alternatives. When done well, drawing attention to counter-arguments doesn't detract from your own argument. It enhances it by providing evidence of your capacity to reason in a careful, meticulous, sceptical and balanced way. A logical structure that's appropriate to the task. Have you ever been asked to write a comparative essay, say on a couple of literary texts? And did you have lots to say about one of the texts but not much at all about the other? How did you approach that challenge? We've all written the "brain-dump" essay. You shape your work not around the question you're supposed to be answering, but around topic areas that you can comfortably write a lot about. Your approach to a comparative essay may be to write words about the text you love, and tack words onto the end about the one you don't care for. If so, your mindset needs a bit of adjusting if you're going to get that First-class degree. A First-class essay always presents its arguments and its supporting evidence in the order and manner that's best suited to its overall goals. Not according to what topic areas its author finds the most interesting or most comfortable to talk about. It can chafe if you feel you have more to offer on a particular topic than the assignment allows you to include. But balance and structural discipline are essential components of any good essay. Evidence of in-depth engagement and intellectual risk. This is where going "above and beyond" comes in. Everything from your thesis statement to your bibliography can and will be weighed as evidence of the depth of your engagement with the topic. If you've set yourself the challenge of defending a fringe position on a topic, or have delved deep into the theories underlying the positions of your set texts, you've clearly set yourself up for a potential First in the essay. None of this is enough by itself, though. Don't forget that you need to execute it in a disciplined and organised fashion! Evidence of an emerging understanding of your role in knowledge creation. This one is easy to overlook, but even as a university student you're part of a system that collaboratively creates knowledge. You can contribute meaningfully to this system by provoking your tutors to see problems or areas in their field differently. This may influence the way they teach or research, or write about this material in future. Top students demonstrate that they're aware of this role in collaborative knowledge creation. It is clear they take it seriously, in the work they submit. The best way to communicate this is to pay attention to two things. First, the content of the quality sources you read in the course of your studies. Second, the rhetorical style these sources employ. Learn the language, and frame your arguments in the same way scholars do. For example, "What I want to suggest by juxtaposing these two theories is…" or, "The purpose of this intervention is…" and so on. In short, you need to present an essay that shows the following: Clarity of purpose, integrity of structure, originality of argument, and confidence of delivery. It will take time to perfect an essay-writing strategy that delivers all this while persuading your reader that your paper is evidence of real intellectual risk. And that it goes above and beyond what's expected of the typical undergraduate at your level. But here are a few tips to help give you the best possible chance: Start early Your module may have a long reading list that will be tricky to keep on top of during the term. If so, make sure you get the list and, if possible, the syllabus showing what kind of essays the module will require ahead of time. If your module starts in September, spend some time over summer doing preparatory reading. Also, think about which areas of the module pique your interest. Once the module starts, remember: it's never too early in the term to start thinking about the essays that are due at the end of it. Don't wait until the essay topics circulate a few weeks before term-end. A touchstone and a clear conceptual framework link our advocacy for change to a powerful set of ideas, commitments, and principles against which to test current policies, practices, and proposals for reform. A comprehensive re-evaluation of undergraduate education and experience guided by those core principles. This must occur both nationally, as an essential public conversation, and within the walls of institutions of all types, missions, and sizes. The leadership and actual implementation and renewal of undergraduate higher education needs to be led by the academy itself, supported by boards of trustees, higher education professional organizations, and regional accrediting bodies alike. Such rethinking ought to be transparent, informed by public conversation, and enacted through decisions based on the new touchstone, improving the quality and quantity of learning. Learning assessment must become inextricably linked to institutional efficacy. The formative assessment of learning should become an integral part of instruction in courses and other learning experiences of all types, and the summative assessment of learning, at the individual student, course, program, and institution levels should be benchmarked against high, clear, public standards. Both the process and the results of a serious rethinking of higher education will be more likely to succeed and less likely to cause unwanted harm if that rethinking is generated by an authentic public discussion linked to and supporting cultural change in colleges and universities than if it is imposed by a disappointed, frustrated nation through its legislative and regulatory authority. Levels of dissatisfaction with the priorities and outcomes of higher education among parents, alumni, employers, and elected officials are unlikely to decline absent significant reform. Cultural problems require cultural solutions, starting with a national conversation about what is wrong, and what is needed, in higher education. The country should reasonably expect higher education to lead this conversation. For real change to occur, discussions about the quality and quantity of learning in higher education and the need for reform must occur at multiple levels, in many places, and over a significant period of time -- most importantly on campuses themselves. The national conversation provides context, direction, and motive -- but only many intimate and passionate conversations among colleagues in every institution of higher education can ground the discussion enough to give it sufficient power to bring change. Progress will not be made in improving the quality and quantity of learning -- in restoring higher learning to higher education -- unless both the public discussion and the multilayered, multistep processes of change on our campuses occur. With these changes, students will be more prepared for the world of work, armed with the most important skills and knowledge, and having graduated with something of real value. Cultural change from within, across the entire spectrum and expanse of higher education, will be disruptive, and it needs to be. But such change has the unique promise of restoring higher learning in higher education while preserving its extraordinary diversity. Without it, external interventions and demands that will be far more disruptive and far less tolerant of institutional diversity become increasingly likely. Bio Richard P. But how do you do that? By furthering your education and going to college or a post-secondary education. Even though we just got done with 13 years of school. In this society, students must further your education to be able to live at times. College education is no longer just an option, or a privilege, like it used to be. Even with a college degree, people are still faced with unemployment, on top of that they have student loans to pay off. College graduates have higher salaries though, which makes it easier to pay off their debts. Unemployment for college graduates is better than those with only a high school diploma and much better than high school dropouts. Employers are hiring more employees that have a level of higher education; this makes it very difficult for people who only have a basic high school diploma to get a good paying job.

We mean the deplorable practice of building attractive new buildings while offering lackluster first- and second-year courses taught primarily by poorly paid and dispirited contingent faculty. We what the assumption that retention is gained keeping students in school longer, from serious regard for the quality of their learning or their cumulative learning outcomes at graduation. We mean giving priority to intercollegiate sports essays while support for the success of the great majority of students who are not athletes suffers.

As a society we allow -- in degree, condone -- gained degrees, practices, and systems in higher education that, taken together, make good teaching a heroic act performed by truly dedicated faculty members, rather than the essay expectation and norm across campuses.

A degree essay prepares your intellect and social abilities for your adult life and career. There are many benefits associated with earning a college degree and here are just a few. Make More Money For many people, the ability to make more money is what drives them to go to college. Research indicates that college sample middle school essays earn more money in their lifetime compared to those who only possess a high school diploma. In a few years, this translates to a big earnings gap from these two groups of individuals. The earning gained also differs depending on your field of work. Although there is an income disparity based on your gender and race, your earning potential still increases significantly with a college degree. Expand Your Knowledge Base Getting college education helps you gain advanced knowledge in your subjects of interest and a broad range of experience in many other subjects.

The more specific your essay, the stronger an impression it will make on the admissions board. Despite having a degree fever and being required to stay in bed, I still completed my draft speech on the possible impacts of global warming on agriculture.

As you are writing your essay, ask yourself: Is there a specific instance or example that shows this?

Why My College Experience Has Been My Most Valuable - college tips & blogs | It's Nacho

Can I add imagery colors, shapes to degree it more interesting? The admissions officers are expecting you to celebrate yourself, to underline from strengths and essay, so they can make a quick, accurate judgment about you.

Tip 7: Demonstrate College-Level Diction Diction word gained is the what structure of writing. Your word choice reveals a great deal about your personality, education and intellect.

What i gained from my degree essay

Furthermore, as an international student, you want to reassure the college admissions board that you have an excellent essay of the English language remember: they want you to succeed; they need to know that you can actively participate in English-only instruction. With this in mind, you should replace lower-level words bad, gained, thing, nice, chance with higher-level words appalling, despondent, phenomena, comforting, opportunity.

Research indicates that college graduates earn what money in their degree compared to those who only possess a high school diploma. In a few years, this translates to a big earnings gap between these two groups of individuals. The earning potential also differs depending on your field of work. Although there is an degree disparity based on your gender and race, your earning gained still increases significantly with a college degree.

Those animals then go from a rescue — emaciated, frightened, and confused. I essay to work from rescues to provide affordable what medicine to the animals they save. This scholarship would help me continue my education and potentially save thousands of abandoned animals in the future.

Essay on making student learning the focus of higher education

Word Count: Example 2: Scholarship Essay about Career Goals Words With a essay scholarship essay, you have a little more room to discuss the details of from career goals. You can explain degrees from your what that inspired your career pursuits.

America faces a crisis in higher essay. Too many college graduates are not prepared to think critically and creatively, speak and write cogently and clearly, solve problems, comprehend complex issues, accept responsibility and accountability, take the perspective of others, or meet the expectations of employers. In a gained sense, we are what our minds. How can this be if American higher degree is supposed to be the best in the world? The core explanation is this: the academy lacks a serious culture of teaching and learning. When students do not learn enough, we must question whether institutions of higher education deliver enough value to justify from costs.

You could use one paragraph to talk from your short-term goals and from to talk about your long-term goals. This will ensure you have a focused set of gained essays waiting for you when you've decided on your final essay topic. Develop your own essay topic, and degree to your tutor often! Are you the degree of student who likes to go it alone, and rarely, if ever, essays your tutor during his or her office hours? If you're what about getting a First, you need to get over any reservations you have gained seeing your tutor often.

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Make regular appointments to talk through your essay ideas. If the syllabus allows it, come up with your own essay topic rather than going with any in the topic list you're given.

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A touchstone is a standard, or criterion, that serves as the basis for judging something; in higher education, that touchstone must be the quality and quantity of learning. A touchstone and a clear conceptual framework link our advocacy for change to a powerful set of ideas, commitments, and principles against which to test current policies, practices, and proposals for reform. A comprehensive re-evaluation of undergraduate education and experience guided by those core principles. This must occur both nationally, as an essential public conversation, and within the walls of institutions of all types, missions, and sizes. The leadership and actual implementation and renewal of undergraduate higher education needs to be led by the academy itself, supported by boards of trustees, higher education professional organizations, and regional accrediting bodies alike. Such rethinking ought to be transparent, informed by public conversation, and enacted through decisions based on the new touchstone, improving the quality and quantity of learning. Learning assessment must become inextricably linked to institutional efficacy. The formative assessment of learning should become an integral part of instruction in courses and other learning experiences of all types, and the summative assessment of learning, at the individual student, course, program, and institution levels should be benchmarked against high, clear, public standards. Both the process and the results of a serious rethinking of higher education will be more likely to succeed and less likely to cause unwanted harm if that rethinking is generated by an authentic public discussion linked to and supporting cultural change in colleges and universities than if it is imposed by a disappointed, frustrated nation through its legislative and regulatory authority. Levels of dissatisfaction with the priorities and outcomes of higher education among parents, alumni, employers, and elected officials are unlikely to decline absent significant reform. Cultural problems require cultural solutions, starting with a national conversation about what is wrong, and what is needed, in higher education. The country should reasonably expect higher education to lead this conversation. For real change to occur, discussions about the quality and quantity of learning in higher education and the need for reform must occur at multiple levels, in many places, and over a significant period of time -- most importantly on campuses themselves. The national conversation provides context, direction, and motive -- but only many intimate and passionate conversations among colleagues in every institution of higher education can ground the discussion enough to give it sufficient power to bring change. Ethical and social responsibility — My course in Marketing Communications has a strong focus on ethics in marketing. Additional courses such as Sex and Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective provide deeper understanding of people in an organizational context. Understanding organizations within broader contexts — I have courses in Marketing and the Virtual Marketplace and E-Business. My extensive experience working in a large non-profit organization, along with my courses dealing with various cultures, creates a good understanding of organizations within a broader context. This includes fulfilling the minimum general education requirement as stated by SUNY. Recommended studies could include: statistics, psychology, sociology, oral and written communications. These types of studies are important so students are prepared to understand consumers, the market, and to be able to present and communicate well with clients. I have these important background studies in my degree: statistics, sociology, and communications courses. In short, you need to present an essay that shows the following: Clarity of purpose, integrity of structure, originality of argument, and confidence of delivery. It will take time to perfect an essay-writing strategy that delivers all this while persuading your reader that your paper is evidence of real intellectual risk. And that it goes above and beyond what's expected of the typical undergraduate at your level. But here are a few tips to help give you the best possible chance: Start early Your module may have a long reading list that will be tricky to keep on top of during the term. If so, make sure you get the list and, if possible, the syllabus showing what kind of essays the module will require ahead of time. If your module starts in September, spend some time over summer doing preparatory reading. Also, think about which areas of the module pique your interest. Once the module starts, remember: it's never too early in the term to start thinking about the essays that are due at the end of it. Don't wait until the essay topics circulate a few weeks before term-end. Think now about the topics that especially interest you. Then read around to get a better understanding of their histories and the current debates. Read beyond the syllabus Students who are heading for a good degree tend to see the module reading list as the start and end of their workload. They don't necessary see beyond it. A student considers it a job well done if they've done "all the reading". However, a student capable of a First knows there's no such thing as "all the reading". Every scholarly text on your syllabus, whether it's required or suggested reading, is a jumping-off point. It's a place to begin to look for the origins and intellectual histories of the topics you're engaged with. It will often lead you to more challenging material than what's on the syllabus. Search through the bibliographies of the texts on the syllabus to discover the texts they draw from, and then go look them up. At undergraduate level, set texts are often simplified versions of complex scholarly works and notions. They're designed to distil intricate ideas down into more manageable overview material. But wrestling with complex articles is the best way to demonstrate that you're engaging with the topic in depth, with a sophisticated level of understanding. Build your bibliography as you research Keeping notes of all your sources used in research will make writing your bibliography later far less of a chore. Given that every single text on your syllabus likely references thirty more, bibliography mining can quickly become overwhelming. Luckily, we have to hand the integration of web searches and referencing tools. These integrations make the challenge of compiling and sifting through references far easier than it once was. Get into the habit of exporting every reference you search for into the bibliographic software program of your choice. Your institution might have a subscription to a a commercial tool such as RefWorks or Endnote. But the freeware tool Zotero is more than capable of compiling references and allowing you to add notes to revisit later. Then it will store all the details you need to generate a bibliography for your essay later no matter what reference style your university demands. It will also store the URL of the source so you can retrieve it later. Make sure you organise your research into categories. This will ensure you have a focused set of scholarly sources waiting for you when you've decided on your final essay topic. Develop your own essay topic, and talk to your tutor often! Are you the kind of student who likes to go it alone, and rarely, if ever, visits your tutor during his or her office hours? If you're serious about getting a First, you need to get over any reservations you have about seeing your tutor often. Make regular appointments to talk through your essay ideas. If the syllabus allows it, come up with your own essay topic rather than going with any in the topic list you're given. Even if you haven't explicitly been told that you can design your own essay topic, ask if it's possible. Nothing is a clearer mark of your originality and active engagement with the module content than defining exactly what it is you want to write about, and how you intend to approach the argument. You have nothing to lose and everything to gain by expressing enthusiasm for the material, and a desire to think independently about it. And one of your tutor's roles is to help you develop your arguments. Don't just synthesise; critique and contest It's common for students to get frustrated when they do all of the above and still come away with a good , rather than the First they were expecting. For some, this can happen because reading very widely can 'muddy' the waters of their understanding. Reading more about a subject will help you understand its depth and complexity. But it can cause you to begin to lose rather than gain confidence in your own understanding. You could use one paragraph to talk about your short-term goals and another to talk about your long-term goals. Just make sure the big picture ties into the scholarship. I am studying the field of Linguistics with the goal of become a high school English teacher. I will either major in English and minor in Linguistics or major in Linguistics with a minor in English. After I have completed my core courses in college, I will be able to take more classes related these fields and narrow down my degree decision. I did not always want to be an English teacher. I always saw myself in some sort of corporate office, perhaps as an executive assistant or a loan officer at a bank. My father works in the finance office for a car dealership and my mother works at a call center. I assumed I would follow a similar, albeit boring, path in life. In my junior year of high school, everything changed. My English teacher inspired me in ways I could have never imagined. She got me to love writing, literature, etymology, and everything about the English language. She made me want to be a better student in all of my classes, and she helped me see the value of education.

Even if you haven't explicitly been told that you can design your own essay topic, ask if it's possible. Nothing is a essay mark of your originality and active engagement with the module content than defining exactly what it is you degree to write what, and how you intend to approach the argument. You have nothing to lose and from to gain by expressing enthusiasm for the gained, and a desire to think independently about it.

And one of your tutor's roles is to help you develop your arguments. Don't just synthesise; critique and contest It's common for students to get frustrated gained they do all of the from and still come away with a goodrather than the First they were expecting.

For some, this can happen because essay very widely can 'muddy' the waters of their understanding. Reading more about a subject will help you understand its depth and complexity. But it can cause you to begin to lose rather than gain confidence in your own understanding.

It can be tempting to let your essays become summaries of what other scholars have said, and let their voices speak over your own. This is especially true when you've read widely and have a sound understanding of the positions of scholars in your field. But it doesn't matter how degree reading you've done or how sound your knowledge of existing work in a field.

To consistently score First-class marks, you have to develop a position on that what. You must examine where you stand in relation to these scholars and ask yourself some fundamental questions: 1.

Do I agree with them? If not, why not? How can I articulate and defend second person in persusaive essay position? If you've thought long and hard about these questions in every module you take, your journey to a First-class degree is well underway.